Hope

May 28, 2018 at 6:45 am | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment
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What do you wish others cared more about? It might be each other. Or the environment. Maybe it’s wellbeing. Or inequality. I ask this question within our program experiences to dig deeper into participant’s passions, interests and purpose. One girl’s response recently though really moved me and has taken me on an exploration over the last month as to what it truly is and how it positively impacts a leader’s journey of potential.

“When the world says give up, hope whispers try it one more time.” – Unknown

Hope. Her response was as simple and as complex as that. It’s like she didn’t need to think about the question, at 11 years of age she just knew deep down that more of it in our homes, communities and the world would make such an impact. I loved then chatting with her further after her initial sharing. That conversation reopened me up to hope’s role when navigating the inevitable successes and challenges that life throws at us.

“Hope is the only thing stronger than fear.” – Suzanne Collins

Hope and optimism can so often be lumped together as one and the same. Listening to a podcast a few weeks ago really reminded me of their differences. Dr. Brené Brown so eloquently described the ongoing 3 part process that hope is: 1. Goal – not what you can’t control, measureable, achievable (real goal), 2. Pathway – I know how to get there, then if I fail I have the capacity to Plan B it (tenacity, grit, work around), if that doesn’t work I’ve got another one, and 3. Agency – I believe in my ability to do this. This process is obviously very different to optimism, having a positive outlook on the future.

“Let your hopes, not your hurts, shape your future.” – Robert H. Schuller

The quote that underpins our leadership development programs is, ‘Leadership is action, not position’ – Donald H. McGannon. Leadership therefore is a verb (the daily embodiment of purposeful skills, attitudes and behaviours that allow us to make a difference in our own and others lives), not a noun (a position, title or rank). So thinking about the 3 part process of hope above, coupled with this quote, it’s definitely a central tenet within a leaders journey. I’ve loved this past month, noticing, listening, learning and being inspired by hope. How does hope show up within your spheres of influence?

“It takes courage to choose hope over fear.” – Mark Zuckerberg

 

 

 

 

 

 

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A Little Hand

May 21, 2018 at 7:10 am | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment
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Learning doesn’t happen in our comfort zone. It only happens when we courageously stretch. I share this reflection with participants all the time, therefore I know it’s important I also live it as well. So when my friend issued me a challenge the other week I had a choice to make. Stay comfortably where I was in an observer position. Or on this occasion, literally jump in!

“You can only grow if you are willing to feel awkward and uncomfortable when you try something new.” – Brian Tracy

We were at a trampoline venue with my friend’s 3 children (7 years old, 5 and 3). It had been so much fun over the last hour and a half jumping, watching and laughing, then came my friends challenge. It was to jump off the trampoline the kids were now using and into the big foam pit. Not the biggest challenge in the world I know, but by that stage of the session I’d moved comfortably into watching mode. ‘Challenge accepted’ I said!

“We rise by lifting others.” – Robert Ingersoll

The three kids cheered me on as I moved onto the trampoline. Bounce, bounce, bounce and then splat is what happened next (luckily those pieces of foam are actually quite comfortable to land on). I’d never been in one of these big foam pits before and I was suddenly realising they are not the easiest things to get out of. Not being able to walk on the bottom meant I was floundering across to the side trying not to sink down too far as I pushed on. When I got to edge the next challenge suddenly appeared.

“Helping one person might not change the world, but it could change the world for one person.” – Unknown

The kids had made getting out after their go look so easy. I definitely did not. So as I momentarily struggled I was met with one of the most powerful gestures we can provide another as humans, a little hand. In this case it literally was a little hand, my friend’s 3 year old was closest to me and he so genuinely and cutely reached down to help pull me out. On seeing this, his 7 year old brother came running across to try and take over as he thought he’d be better able to assist. I thanked them both for offering, then scrambled my way out.

“A person’s most useful asset is not a head full of knowledge, but a heart full of love, an ear ready to listen and a hand willing to help others.” – Unknown

Those simple small gestures had such an impact on me. We all experience struggle, challenge and discomfort throughout our lives, and a little hand at those times really does go such a long way. Whether it’s family, friends, colleagues or a complete stranger, we can make such a difference through our thoughts, words and/or actions. No matter how old we are! A 3 year old reminded me of that.

“Helping others, without expecting anything in return is what true self-worth is all about.” – Gavin Bird

 

The Field We Love Playing On

May 13, 2018 at 11:56 pm | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment
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“Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing, there is a field. I’ll meet you there.” – Rumi

The quote above has stayed closely with me ever since I first heard it many years ago. It’s a theme that I strive to personally embody (imperfectly) and professionally foster (again imperfectly) each and every day. Our individual and shared journeys of potential can at times feel littered by judgement and competition (a combination of our own and others). Whether that judgement and competition is real, perceived or feels embedded and immovable, it’s presence can have a significant impact on our ability to lead and make a difference in our own and others lives.

“Cooperation is the thorough conviction that nobody can get there unless everybody gets there.” – Virginia Burden

Cooperative advantage for us is how we change the game. Unpacking, fostering and leveraging it within our own and others lives opens up pathways to purposefully reconnect with the field we love playing on. Interconnectedness is our innate way of being as humans. It’s also how we most effectively bring leadership to life. This past week I got to witness another inspiring example of what’s possible when we consistently reflect on, practice and celebrate cooperative advantage within our spheres of influence.

“It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.” – Harry S Truman

The Year 6 students were completing their 9th L.E.A.D. with Me weekly session. The three classes have only got one more program day this week that will conclude this part of the program. The reason I say this part of the program is we are always committed to connection to meaningful action beyond all our program experiences, whether it’s through ongoing communication, reflection opportunities or the continued practice of the student’s developing skills, attitudes and behaviours. That’s why last week’s session was all about how do we bridge the gap, between where we are and where we can be.

“The real challenge is for each of us to determine where we feel we can make the most impact.” – Jay Samit

In a particular challenge two groups became one. They weren’t told to. They didn’t need to ask permission to. And they certainly weren’t looking for recognition from others for doing so. They just noticed, and then acted on, that the combination of people, resources and time would be so much more effective this way than trying to go it alone. It was powerful to watch. Especially because in the now bigger group no one needed to be in control. There were invitational questions, each group member was heard, everyone bought in, everyone played a role, and really importantly everyone celebrated the journey up to and post completion. It was cooperative advantage in action.

“Individual commitment to a group effort – that is what makes a team work, a company work, a society work, a civilisation work.” – Vince Lombardi

Taking On The Challenge

May 7, 2018 at 5:20 am | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment
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Just over a week ago I got the opportunity to have a quick trip up to one of my happy places. The Blue Mountains have always felt like a second home, I’ve been so fortunate right throughout my life to spend time there with family and friends. Nowadays trips also include amazing adventures with some great people who live up there (like I’ve written about in the past, climbing, abseiling and canyoning). The week before provided another great example of challenging myself, while also getting playful with a particular challenge that I set for my friend.

“Don’t limit your challenges; challenge your limits.” – Jerry Dunn

I’m the least experienced climber out of the four of us (if you don’t take into account their 8 month old baby who came with us the other week – see photo below). So for me the challenge we’re navigating can feel amplified on these adventure days. But I’m always inspired by what I’m actually capable of doing with the support of friends who first of all have incredible expertise. Then secondly, who believe so much in my potential (even when at certain times I may be doubting it). And then really importantly, see success through a lens of courageously stretching comfort zones, putting in effort and celebrating growth. It’s such a privilege to spend time with people like that.

“Challenges are what makes life interesting and overcoming them is what makes life meaningful.” – Joshua J. Marine

So now to the picture above, this is where the playful challenge comes in for my friend. The 25m climb we were doing was new to me, but was one my friend had done many times before. You may notice he’s only got one shoe on, sorry Marty. What you may not be able to see is the blindfold he’s also wearing. As I belayed I was in awe of the way he was open to the challenge, navigated safely the ups and downs that he encountered along the way, and then reflected on what this new experience had taught him once he returned back down to the ground. A challenge is always an opportunity, if we choose to embrace it in that way.

“Challenges are gifts that force us to search for a new center of gravity. Don’t fight them. Just find a new way to stand.” – Oprah Winfrey

These adventure days always remind me of the importance of challenge within our journeys of potential. They also always remind of how important continuing to be a participant is when you’re a facilitator. If I’m hoping to foster choosing courage over comfort within our programs, then I have to also be reflecting on, practicing and celebrating those skills, attitudes and behaviours within my own life as well. I can’t wait for the next opportunity to explore the possibilities, discover potential and act authentically with my friends again in the Blue Mountains. I wonder what challenge I’ll have to be open to then.

“We don’t grow when things are easy; we grow when we face challenges.” – Joyce Meyer

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